With elected officials getting an earful from their constituents at town hall meetings, some – like Marco Rubio – have found ways to duck these community-driven events. The voters, in response, have pushed to get the attention of electeds. In Rubio’s case, for example, as many as 150 people gathered at his Bridgeport Center office on a weekly basis, disrupting Marco’s team, as well as others not associated with the senator who also worked in the building. Eventually, the owners of Bridgeport decided not to renew Rubio’s contract, forcing his staff to meet with constituents at libraries and coffee shops. With Sen. Cory Gardner, Colorado citizens have their own absentee official. But a coalition serenaded Gardner with mariachi music, in hopes of getting his attention.

This week, Gardner attended a members-only meeting with the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce at the Cheyenne Mountain Resort. Three organizations – including Conservation Colorado – came together and paid the $250 to register as chamber members. They then invited the Sol de la Tierra mariachi band to perform “¿Dónde Estàs Corazón?” – a love song that Conversation Colorado’s Hilda Nucete describes as being “when the guy really messes up and you’re trying to get back the girl. So we’re just trying to get [Gardner] to fall in love with us again.”

Unfortunately, the town hall organizers quickly cut off the six-piece mariachi band after it started playing. Hannah Parson – the Chamber’s chief economic development officer – told Nucete to contact Gardner’s staff instead. But with so much at stake – including the environment and the health of disenfranchised communities – they will keep fighting for his attention. With many in the state in favor of restricting the coal industry and regulating carbon dioxide emissions, the administration is going against Colorado citizens’ best interests.

“Current attempts by the Trump administration and Congress ignore public opinion and science, and promise to rollback all advances towards curbing emissions,” Nucete told Latin Life Denver. “This is a threat to public health and the prosperity of all Americans. Colorado as many other Western States, has borne the brunt of a decade of record breaking temperatures, floods, wildfires, low snowpack, and severe drought.”

Nucete adds that for months they’ve tried to get Gardner, but that he has continued to dodge them. According to KOAA, Gardner argues that he’s held dozens of meetings with the community in the past. But until they can meet with him and properly voice their concerns, they may need to continue hiring mariachi bands. Check out the Sol de la Tierra below:

 

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