Last week, the Dominican Republic’s ShaveUrLegz crew brought Pineapple Ball to Santo Domingo for its fifth edition. Since its beginnings in 2013, the beachside fest has grown in scope and size, counting 3,000 attendees in 2016. It’s poised to continue making a splash in the island’s blooming indie scene.

Mula, Sotomayor, and more provided a lush soundtrack for the scenic backdrop of Playa Caribe, with festivalgoers bringing their best beach looks. Check out some of the best fits we saw during the fest below.


Laura Lai, 27

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
I just grabbed the first thing I got from the closet.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
I don’t have any favorite band. I’m just here for the booze.

Ryan Ureña (aka Cucuso), 29

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
I just picked it like whatever – I got into my closet and picked it. Actually, the funniest thing is my shirt “Me siento oki, so I just picked it up and got some shorts because it’s very hot, and we’re in the Caribbean.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
I just came here to see Riccie Oriach; he’s my brother. We’ve known each other for a bunch of years; we’ve been together since we were little boys, so I came here to support him because he’s my brother and I love him. He has a style that is psychedelic, but also has tropical stuff, which is something characteristic of Dominicans, and that’s what’s cool about it. Everyone enjoys it and dances to it. It’s very fun.

Carla Bretón, 18

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
Well, I was thinking of something with flowers because it’s the Pineapple Ball and it’s tropical-themed. And of course, some shorts.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Mula. I like their sound. They sound different from any Dominican band I’ve heard.

Jenny Mella & Daniela Guzman

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
Jenny: I was thinking about the night and the tropics. I just chose something fun.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Jenny: Mula. They have a lot of influence on the bass of the Dominican Republic. They are contributing a lot in the music industry by bringing a fresh, current sound.

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
Daniela: For my look, I wanted something fun and comfortable.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Daniela: My favorite band is Mula. It’s a mix between what’s old, typical from here the Dominican Republic, and modern beats. I think it’s a fusion that works very well.

Jonathan Diaz, 32

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
This shirt represents my non-profit foundation. We make shirts to get donations. I like the designs because they’re drawn by one of the members, and that’s what I always wear to represent my organization in the DR, Bright Island Outreach. We are a medical foundation, and we come here to Dominican Republic to do dental treatment at no cost to lower-income communities. We collaborate with ShaveUrLegz, they promote us, they accompany us in our mission. We always work together.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
I have two favorite bands here: Gran Poder de Diosa and Riccie Oriach y la Alucinante Banda. First, Gran Poder de Diosa has been my favorite band for the past three years, and this year, Riccie Oriach came with a fresh sound, and I have to put them in the same pedestal as Gran Poder de Diosa. I think Riccie will elevate Dominican music better than what is out right now, because the public is not listening to music that’s contributing to society or the youth, so I think Riccie is fresh…without the use of violence, drugs, and exploitation of women that Dominican urban music is promoting and the youth is consuming.

Gloria Bih, 31

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
We’re at the beach, so just wanted simplicity.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Sotomayor contributes with the jungle beats and it’s groovy. We’re Caribbean people so we enjoy the grooviness.

Angel Leger, 28

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
I just picked something tropical, and went with it.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
It’s not a band, it’s two DJ’s, Sabo and Hoj, and they contribute a ton with their funk music in the DR. Dominicans are into it.

Ivanna Candelier, 28

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
Actually, I was dressing up with my friends and I was really stressed out because I don’t usually dress up with a lot of people around, so when they got out of the room I was like, “I’m gonna wear this, fuck it.” It’s comfortable; I like it. And I always wear red lipstick.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Rawayana is not Dominican, but they are Latin American, so I think it’s amazing how they integrate the music with the instruments and lyrics. You can feel the Caribbean, South American, and Latin American influence in general. They’re fun.

Juan, 21

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
I was looking for something that would simulate what the beach is, so the vibe was going for something tropical.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Riccie Oriach, of course. He’s bringing back what Dominican music is all about: merengue, salsa and bringing it back to be pop and modern.

Shantal Mesa, 28

Photo by Carlos Rodríguez for Remezcla

Can you tell us about your look? How did you pick your outfit today?
Honestly, I didn’t know what to wear, and I wanted something edgy. I had two pieces of clothes and I put them together. Then my sister said, put on the boots, and I did. It’s like a Burning Man/Coachella kind of thing.

How do you think your favorite genre or band contributes to the local music scene?
Rawayana – they’re Venezuelans; they’re here [in the Dominican Republic] working. They’ve been here a lot, and it’s something that the Dominican scene likes, and they’re bringing something positive to the table. Good vibes, positive vibes, and that’s why a lot of people are here right now. They speak about stuff people are afraid to talk about. They talk about politics; they talk about living in a third world country, and they say it in an inspiring way, which makes me want to listen to them.