It was only a matter of time. Netflix, that ever-growing streaming service whose sole purpose as of late seems to become every single channel on your cable subscription, is betting on becoming your go-to place for global reality TV. After the success of Terrace House, the Japanese franchise take on Real World they acquired and began producing in 2015, Netflix is now heading to Mexico City for its first Latin American reality show. From the looks of it, audiences around the world can expect a kind of Real Housewives meets Keeping Up with the Kardashians-style series. Only this one is set to follow a group of Mexico City’s wealthy socialites as well as some U.S. expats. Oh, and as the press release for the show makes clear it will give us a glimpse of their “opulent lifestyles.”

Made in Mexico boasts a cast of nine that runs the gamut from “successful businessman and nightclub impresario who wants to shed his playboy past and settle down into a new life” (Pepe Díaz, who rocks dark curls and a beard) and a “cultured, well-traveled American food blogger” who moved to Mexico City for her fiancé (Liz Woodburn, short wavy hair, blonde) to a “TV personality and former swimsuit model who has dreams of being a pop star” (Shanik Aspe, long wavy hair, blonde), and an “American expat who left a job at Vogue to follow the love of her life to Mexico” (Chantal Trujillo, long wavy hair, blonde). Already, the bios of these obscenely rich, beautiful, and well-connected Mexico City residents (they really all look like they came from a Televisa central casting call) suggests there’ll be plenty of drama to go around, what with activists and philanthropists (Hanna Jaff) and fashion designers (Kitzia Mitre) in the cast.

Columba Díaz, for example, a high-fashion model will apparently find herself at the center of a love triangle she wants no part of while party-boy slash entrepreneur Roby Checa (bearded, no curls) seems ripe to join the list of “bad boys” these shows always need. At the center of it all will be Maryland-born actor-TV host-model Carlos Girón Longoria (also bearded, obviously), who’s estranged from his father but has plenty to deal with due to his friends’ various dramas. With scant details and not even a trailer to show, we can definitely anticipate that Made in Mexico will show off some of the city’s most exclusive venues, will feature one or two parties that’ll set up tense moments between its young cast, and will likely have you obsessing over every tiny detail of the lives of these soon-to-be-reality-TV stars.

Made in Mexico drops on Netflix September 28, 2018.

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