In the 18 months of his presidency, Donald Trump has targeted media outlets and journalists. As a matter of fact, his go-to insult is to describe CNN as “fake news,” but he’s also named the press the enemy of the people. Even before he won the election on November 2016, Trump censored Mexican journalist Jorge Ramos. When the Univision reporter attempted to ask a questions during a press conference, Trump ordered his bodyguards to remove Ramos from the room.

But journalism is a pillar of US democracy, and its increasingly important that media outlets are as diverse as our country so that they can represent heterogeneous perspectives and experiences of the country. This is especially crucial at a time when vulnerable communities are under constant threat. 

Still, newsroom diversity remains painfully low, with whites and males still making up the majority of voices. In 2017, only 25 percent of top newsrooms had at least one non-white editor, while minorities made up only 16.6 percent of all newsroom employees (FYI, Latinos in the US make up almost 18 percent of the US population), according to a survey by the American Society of News Editors and Google.

The lack of diversity in newsrooms is largely credited to a scarcity of opportunities for minority journalists to enter the top media outlets and network with editors who can get their work ahead. Scholarships and fellowships are two mechanisms that can help battle Donald Trump’s attacks on the press and level the playing field in journalism. 

Here are five scholarships and fellowships aimed at diversifying media for future generations.

1

NAHJ Facebook Journalism Project Scholarship

Facebook and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists joined forces to deliver new scholarship opportunities for aspiring journalists in 2018. The scholarship, which is part of Facebook’s latest attempt to provide tools and training for journalists, grants $10,000 to five students every year.

To apply, students must be in their junior or senior year of undergraduate or be enrolled in a graduate program. The application process requests a letter of recommendation, clips, and completed coursework that involves storytelling.

You can read more information about the scholarship here.

2

NAHJ Maria Elena Salinas Scholarship

Since 2002, legendary Mexican journalist Maria Elena Salinas and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists have awarded a $2,500 scholarship to students who want to pursue a career in Spanish-language journalism.

You can read more information about the next round of applications here.

3

National Press Club Diversity Scholarship for Studies in Journalism

 

Every year, the National Press Club awards a $2,000 one-year scholarship for minority journalism students. The scholarship also includes a one-time $500 book stipend.

Applicants must send an essay, letter of recommendation, and high school transcript.

While this year’s applications are now closed, you can read more about the scholarship for 2019 here.

4

Journalism Institute for Media Diversity

Wayne University’s Journalism Institute for Media Diversity is an organization created to improve diversity inside newsroom and provide a space for untrained journalists to grow. More than 150 graduates have been part of the Institute, which was created in 1984.

The Institute also helps students obtain internships in top newsrooms. Some graduates have interned at The New York TimesBloomberg NewsWall Street Journal, among others.

Applicants must be students at Wayne University and maintain a GPA of 3.0 or more. Read more information about the Journalism Institute for Media Diversity here.

5

ProPublica Diversity Scholarship

ProPublica knows associations and clubs are a key space for journalists to network with the right people. This is why the investigative news outlet now grants 21 journalists a $700 scholarship to attend its respective national association conventions.

The National Association of Hispanic Journalists hosts an annual convention in different parts of the country. This year’s was held in Miami in July 18–21.

Applications open in the spring on ProPublica’s website. Read more about this opportunity here.

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