The Cinema Tropical Awards are right around the corner, which means some of New York City’s most illustrious cinephiles will be converging on the New York Times headquarters to celebrate the seventh edition of the world’s oldest awards ceremony for Latin American film. There will be winners, there will be losers, but more importantly, the best Latin American fiction and documentary features from the last year will get a night of well-deserved recognition and praise.

This year’s edition features 23 films from a total of eight countries, with Colombia boldly asserting its presence alongside more traditional powerhouses like Mexico, Argentina, and Chile. Likewise, directors like Tatiana Huezo, Maya Goded, and Marília Rocha make a compelling case for female directors in the region with strong contenders across categories like Best Director, Fiction Film and Best Documentary Film.

Check out the trailer below for a feel of the stunning diversity of styles and subjects that make up this year’s edition, and mark your calendars for the annual Cinema Tropical Awards film series, which will showcase the big winners at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image later this winter.

Best Fiction Film

Still from ‘El abrazo de la serpiente’ by Ciro Guerra

TRAILER: Arturo Ripstein Tackles the Real-Life Murder of Dwarf Luchadores in ‘Bleak Street’

Here are the 14 Latin American Films in the Running for Best Foreign Language Film Oscar

15 Latino Films You May Have Missed In Theaters That You Can Now Stream Online

Meet the Indigenous Actors Who Were the Heart of This Year’s Oscar-Nominated Films

TRAILER: ‘El Abrazo de la Serpiente’ Takes You Deep Into the Colombian Amazon

TRAILER: Mexico City Skaters Get Caught Up in the Black Market Blood Trade in ‘Te Prometo Anarquía’

Julio Hernández Cordón on How His Script About Drug-Dealing Skaters Turned Into a Movie on Blood Traffickers

From Narco Vampires to Brazilian Cowboys: 5 Must-See Films From Latin America’s Young Auteurs

Gabriel Mascaro Takes on Macho Culture In His Film on a Cowboy Who Dreams of Designing Clothes

Best Director, Fiction Film

‘Bleak Street’

Neither Machos nor Maricas: The Changing Face of Masculinity in Latin American Cinema

The Director of ‘Embrace of the Serpent’ On Why His Amazon-Set Film Flips History on Its Head

Colombia Receives Its First Ever Oscar Nomination for Best Foreign Language Film

‘El Abrazo de la Serpiente’ Wins Every Major Category at Colombia’s Academy Awards

8 GIFs That Bring Us Into the Dreamlike Fantasy World of Uruguayan Comedy ‘The Apostate’

Best First Film

‘La tierra y la sombra’

Latin American Movies at the Cannes Film Festival Get (Mostly) Rave Reviews

César Augusto Acevedo Is Fighting Hollywood’s Negative Stereotypes of Colombia One Movie at a Time

Director Felipe Guerrero Shares Why His Film on Colombia’s Civil War Is Centered on Women

The Co-Director of ‘Siembra’ on Making a Film About the Resilience of Colombia’s Displaced People

Best Documentary Film

‘Tempestad’ Courtesy of CLAUDIA TOMASINNI

Margaret Mead Fest’s Latino Doc Lineup Is a Dose of Empathy in Times of Deep Division

TRAILER: Get a Glimpse at the First Mexican Doc To Premiere at Sundance in a More Than a Decade

TRAILER: ‘Tempestad’ Is a Heartbreaking Look at Life After Being Wrongfully Imprisoned

Best Director, Documentary Film

‘Plaza de la Soledad’

Maya Goded on Her Doc about the Mothers and Grandmothers Who Work the Streets of Mexico City

Tatiana Huezo on ‘Tempestad,’ Her Poetic Doc About a Childhood Friend’s Wrongful Imprisonment

Best U.S. Latino Film

‘Los Sures’ Photo: Ellen Tolmie

Daniel Maldonado Based His Film on Real Events and Turned NYC’s Subway Into a Movie Set

5 Facts From This Harrowing Doc on Indigenous Activists Who Died Fighting for Peru’s Rainforest

From Bike Brigades to Rainforest Defenders: 3 Must-See Docs at Human Rights Watch Film Festival

‘Living Los Sures’ Aims to Preserve Williamsburg’s Forgotten Latino History

What Was Williamsburg Like in 1984? See ‘Los Sures’ Documentary and More at the New York Film Festival

How a VHS of ‘Los Sures’ Sparked a Movement to Preserve Williamsburg’s Latino History

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