Record stores used to be the backbone of music fandom. They were physical places where fans would gather to debate artists and songs for hours on end. In record stores, legends were built and broken, and obscure music reached eager ears. Communities were built there.

After the arrival of CDs, mp3s, and streaming giants, record stores experienced a period of adaptation, near extinction, and then renewed interest, best illustrated through events like Record Store Day.

In Mexico, things went south for record stores – and fast. When CDs emerged, they were perceived as aspirational luxuries, so it became a priority in casual listeners’ households to replace vinyl with physical discs. Chain stores and bootleg tapes (later CD-Rs) forced smaller outlets out of business, so by the 2000s, there were very few stores left standing.

The global vinyl boom has made many fans into serious collectors, and CDMX has a healthy sampling of stores for cratediggers. Here’s a handy guide of where to shop for music in the Mexican capital.

Hit up these 10 shops for Record Store Day on Saturday, April 22, 2017. Check out the best releases from Latino artists here.

1

La Roma Records

La Roma Records
Álvaro Obregón 200 Bis 1, Col. Roma

As one of the prime movers of vinyl in Mexico, La Roma Records has an excellent selection of titles from local artists and imprints like Arts & Crafts México, Terrícolas Imbéciles, and Discos Tormento. They work closely with musicians, festivals, and labels for special products and events like listening parties, showcases, and limited releases. New releases usually land here first.

2

Música En Vinyl

Música En Vinyl

Música En Vinyl
Jalapa 164, Roma Nte.

This store usually has great titles in stock, but the real charm of Músic en Vinyl is their hardware selection and accessories. You can even bring your turntable for repairs or a tune-up.

3

Discos Mono

Discos Mono
Jalapa 129-B, Roma Nte.

If you’re looking for music off the beaten path, Discos Mono is the place for you. No matter the style of music you’re looking for, you can count on finding something rare and eclectic at affordable prices. Mono works with distributors like Forced Exposure, Revolver, Secretly Canadian, and Mexican Summer. If you want esoteric rhythms or left-field sounds, look no further.

4

Revancha

Revancha
Colima 110, Roma Nte.

This is your one-stop shop for R&B, hip-hop, soul, cumbia, Afrobeat, dub, and more. When it comes to grooves or soulful sounds, this is the place to come.

5

Dedos Sucios

Dedos Sucios
José Rivera 163 Local A, Col. Moctezuma 1ra Sección

Off the beaten path of the Roma-Condesa neighborhoods, Dedos Sucios is a unique shop any serious collector should visit. They specialize in 7” used records with a great selection of Mexican and Latin American editions, focusing on R&B, soul, psych, cumbia, mambo, and cha cha from the 50s and 70s.

6

Chez Nobody

Chez Nobody
República de Guatemala 10, 2° Piso Despacho 209, Centro

A newish store in the city, Chez Nobody has a love for all things 60s; whether it’s garage, mod, Merseybeat, or acid rock from around the world, the decade (and its successors) are well-represented here.

7

Carcoma Records

Carcoma Records
Insurgentes Sur 363, Col. Hipódromo Condesa

If you’re into heavier styles, Carcoma has got you covered. Inside the Rock Shop “mall” on Insurgentes Avenue, they stock everything from the most anthemic pop punk to the harshest crust and black metal records you can think of.

8

Revolution Records

Revolution Records
Insurgentes Sur 395, Col. Hipódromo Condesa

Probably the least hip store on this list, Revolution is run by old school rockers who love The Doors and Rush – and it looks that way, too. It’s worth a visit nonetheless, since they specialize in collectibles. If you’re lucky, you can score a Japanese edition, a rare bootleg, or other stuff not stocked anywhere else.

9

Discos Colombia Chiquita

Discos Colombia Chiquita
República del Salvador 28, Int 15, Col. Centro

Run by Manuel Perea of Sonido Fascinación fame, the store is filled to the brim with rare salsa and cumbia releases. Prices can be high, but Colombia Chiquita is your best shot at scoring an OG Fania LP in mint condition.

10

La Lagunilla

La Lagunilla
López Rayón 46 lote 1, corner of Ignacio Allende, Col. Centro

Though La Lagunilla isn’t technically a store, tons of shops and a giant flea market made this a cratedigger’s dream come true back in the day. Nowadays, collectors and vendors are in the know, and valuable releases don’t come by as often. As one of the most iconic spots in Mexico City, it’s still worth a visit.