We are living through an era where more music is available to us than ever – whether it be via social media, streaming or apps. But despite this wealth of options, it can be difficult to cut through the industry hype, the homogenizing algorithms, and find something new and exciting. In our weekly Nuevo Noise playlist, you’ll find some of our favorite releases of the week – from the most exciting new names in urbano to the burgeoning SoCal neo-Chicano soul wave and everything in between.

This week’s playlist is brought to you by the 2020 Census, giving a voice to rising Latinx neighborhoods similar to how Nuevo Noise gives a voice to rising Latinx artists each week. Follow our Nuevo Noise playlist featuring these tracks and more on Spotify.

Carolina Camacho - "Enredao"

Quarantine may have us all needing human contact, but Dominican indie chanteuse Carolina Camacho is dwelling on the magic of physical chemistry past and future on new single, “Enredao.” Late night texts and tongue tied flirtations glide cheekily over a melange of digital and organic percussion, while sparse synth stabs and Camacho’s nimble vocals echo the peeks and valleys of a hot and steamy evening of passion. –Richard Villegas

GABIFUEGO - "Para Nada"

You may not expect the guitarist for a meteoric indie pop band like Boy Pablo to moonlight as a perreo romántico craftsman, but Gabriel Nystad Muñoz aka GABIFUEGO is determined to break out of the rocker boy mold and make the masses grind. With his second solo single, “Para Nada,” the Chilean-Norwegian reggaeton rookie delivers a bop of stereo exploding proportions. He feverishly tries to sweet talk his boo into a committed relationship, while the song’s bass heavy beat and jangling percussion incites all kinds of naughty dance floor antics. –Richard Villegas

La Bruja de Texcoco - "CHÉNI"

Mexico City’s La Bruja de Texcoco is nothing short of living art, and her latest single “CHÉNI (miedo)” is a refreshing intersection of poetry and folk music that will leave you daydreaming on a colorful chinampa in Xochimilco. Framed within the sounds of an evocative violin, gentle harp strumming, distant horns, and La Bruja’s own entrancing cooing, the song, and exquisitely Cecilia Villaverde-directed video, are timely reminders to live in the moment and engage with the world and all its wonders, while turning our fear of the unknown into an affirming, driving catalyst. –Richard Villegas

Upgrayedd Jessica - "Mango Jungle"

Summer is fast approaching and the feeling that “Mango Jungle” evokes is in the air. Baile funk rhythms flow as the melody floats through an implied salty breeze. You can almost picture the sweaty dancers packing the floor for this one. While it might seem somewhat like a departure for Mexico’s Upgrayedd Jessica (a.k.a. Smurphy), her experimental tendencies surface through the cracks of the track, giving it a dreamlike quality. –Marco Hassan

Le 1991 - "Todo El Tiempo"

During the global pandemic, the feeling of being trapped becomes prevalent and we wish we could find a door to walk through and away from this nightmare. Aguascalientes, Mexico duo Le 1991 expresses this mood through a combination of harmony and dissonance. Grungy guitars embody desperation, while glimpses of hope enter the mix at various points. However, “Todo El Tiempo” mostly remains a muffled shout throughout. –Marco Hassan

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L.A. WITCH - "I Wanna Lose"

With current clamors for racial equality, what better time to listen to a garage punk banger about celebrating triumph. L.A. WITCH provide an anthem for those who rebel against the notion of productivity as the only measure of self-worth. Dressing it up in vintage “Born To Be Wild” riffs, acid-damaged fuzz washes and psych pop moments of beauty; “I Wanna Lose” is a dirty throwback that feels vital. –Marco Hassan

Hablemos del Alma - "Desacelera"

There’s music that references the past and then there’s music that attempts to recreate the past to a scary degree. Take for example “Desacelera,” by Santiago de Chile’s Hablemos del Alma, which sounds like something you’ve heard on a Cold Wave Beats To Get Depressed and Study To playlist a few years back. Tightly sequenced synths and icy drum pads invite you to travel back in time to the ‘80s for the best EBM party you weren’t even born yet to attend. –Marco Hassan

Valdes - Sueno Despierto

Argentine duo Valdes just dropped their latest album Postal, and it includes a mesmerizing collaboration with trap producer Halpe titled, “Sueño Despierto.” But this isn’t a trap track at all; instead, they created a 2020 take on soul and psych-pop that has us melting all over the floor with its lyrics about the kind of love that makes you feel like life is all a daydream. –Cheky

Sunsplash & Bestia - "Bombacha"

After a long pause, Venezuelan electronic music artist Sunsplash is back with “Bombacha,” a steamy new track with frequent collaborator, Bestia (f.k.a. Sexilia.) The pair made a slow reggaeton-inspired tropical concoction that brings the summer inside. It’s all about seduction, especially when Bestia hits those low notes and when the sax solo kicks in. We’re already sweating up in here. –Cheky

Catnapp - "Slow (2k20 Version)"

For the second preview of her upcoming Monkeytown Records EP DAMAGE, Berlin-based Argentine artist Catnapp chose a rework of her 2017 track, “Slow,” spruced up with the help of producer IXXF. “Slow (2k20 Version)” takes the track to a post-PC Music territory. Cute, blown out synthetic percussion explodes around Catnapp as she tries hard to squeeze the memory of a former lover out of her brain. –Cheky

TAYHANA x Desdel Barro x Braian - "Desamor de Primavera"

Like a carousel ride spinning off its axis, this club track from the three Hiedrah producers finds exhilaration in the chaos. For the day you need to spiral a little to stand up straight, “Desamor de Primavera” has you covered. –Caitlin Donohue

Manitas Nerviosas - "Cactus Vision"

Monterrey noise chanteuse Manitas Nerviosas delivers a strobing journey into self–a slow-moving dirge of introspection. The “Cactus Vision” trip is just one journey on Sonidos en Resiliencia, the debut compilation from women and LGBTQIA+ artists centered Mexico City electronic label, Otris. –Caitlin Donohue

Brvtus - "MI Musik Eh"

Listen through producer Brvtus’ Hechizo EP for further proof of CDMX’s prowess when it comes to 2 a.m. perreo fragmentation. Opening track “Mi Musik Eh” strafes Alexis & Fido with ’80s synths, adding a new dimension of tension to El Duo Sobrenatural. –Caitlin Donohue