For Chile, September is the most meaningful time of the year, since this month memorializes both national independence and the right-wing military coup that left its public scarred and divided for generations. Every year, before Chileans let loose with asados, terremotos, and cuecas on September 18 – a solemn remembrance and heated debate regarding the events of September 11, 1973 dominate the national conversation. Never too shy to add her two cents, rhyme goddess Ana Tijoux has released a cover of Victor Jara’s heartbreaking folk classic “Luchín.”

As the daughter of exiles, Tijoux is directly connected to the events of 1973, referencing the coup and the regime multiple times throughout her career, most notably on her global smash “1977.” As someone who has built a public persona talking about the pressing issues of her country, including women’s and indigenous rights, deforestation and student protests, it comes as no surprise that Tijoux would revisit such an important part of the country’s and her own personal history. The song – one of Jara’s most iconic – tells the story of a young boy growing in poverty-stricken Chile. The nod to Jara is particularly keen, as the legendary folk singer was one of the first and most prominent victims of the Pinochet regime.

Tijoux has been slowly teasing her return to Chile’s center stage, most recently with the track “Calaveritas.” With the release of “Luchín,” we not only have new music to feast on, but a season-appropriate statement from one of Chile’s most powerful and poignant voices.