Here at Remezcla, we actively research local music scenes in the American continent, and sometimes we get lucky and stumble upon initiatives created by like-minded people who get together to support each other in order to amplify their creative work – opening windows for us to learn about new musical acts. Such is the case of En La Mira, a brand new compilation series put together by Peruvian projects Puente Sonoro and Hype Peru, in collaboration with visual artist Yamil Álvarez. These compilations are aimed to help spread some of the coolest independent music made not only in Lima, but also in the rest of Peru.

En La Mira’s first volume, now available on streaming platforms, comprises the work of 10 bands and solo artists from Lima, Chiclayo, and Trujillo. Although there isn’t an explicit theme for the compilation, it takes only one spin to notice the curators certainly have a penchant for nostalgia, as many of the music included lean towards vintage sounds and sensibilities. It mainly features indie-pop and pop-rock, but also provides flashes of folk, hip-hop, and bedroom pop.

If you like bouncy bass lines, laid-back guitar or synth solos (or both), and dancing with your eyes closed, you’re in for a treat. Projects like Los Niños Vudú, Los Estroboscópicos, Somontano, and Ciudad Pánico participate with tracks that ease up the vibe and bring smiles to our faces, referencing 80s sounds in their own way. In the same neighborhood, but featuring funk-infused guitar work and mellow vocals, is “Señales,” by Pats Lunar, an artist you may want to keep your eye on.

Buenos Aires-based singer/songwriter Santa Garcia gives En La Mira Vol. 1 a different angle with “Sierra,” an emotional acoustic number featuring Elisa Tokeshi, making up one of the compilation’s peak moments. Two quirky lo-fi songs also caught our attention: Diego Trip’s slow-burning ballad “Película,” and “Aquí,” by Flipdown, which splits its personality into three distinct movements (R&B, hip-hop, and trap), and it’s very fun to witness.

En La Mira Vol. 1 wasn’t exactly made to change our lives, but it is a great snapshot of what’s brewing in Peru’s bedroom studios, rehearsal spaces, and music venues. It represents a threat that is sticking out, and it’s our call to pull it further and further to discover a whole new world of music where our next favorites could be waiting for us. We recommend you start pulling at that thread ASAP.