Back in November, Remezcla and Spotify launched an editorial collaboration aimed at discovering exciting new talent and sketching a portrait of the music movements making waves in the Latinx space. In previous iterations of Nuevo Noise, we highlighted Ecuador’s new electronic boom through Mateo Kingman’s “Sendero del Norte,” and the deconstructed reggaeton textures dominating global club culture through Florentino’s “Bloodline.”

Today, we’ve got a delivery of fresh new songs to explore. Listen to the latest edition of Nuevo Noise below and be sure to follow the playlist on Spotify. Plus, scroll down to get a primer on two of the artists we’re betting on.

NOIA

Photo by Maximillian Sandor Lakner

Born Gisella Fulla-Silvestre, Barcelona-Brooklyn producer NOIA first stunned us with her cinematically arresting Habits EP last fall. With a degree from Berklee School of Music, NOIA’s intricately arranged synth pop is as cerebral as it is beautiful, fueled by her expertise as a film sound designer. Gisella is the child of a Communist activist who fought against the Franco dictatorship in Spain, and the revolutionary environment she was raised in clearly nurtured her brand of philosophical synth pop.

“Itaca Tropical,” the song we selected for Nuevo Noise, mirrors that idiosyncratic approach to music production. It’s weightless, flooded by light, but layered with digital distortion and reverb in a way that feels like you’re building minimalist architecture right alongside her. Having played shows across Brooklyn over the past few months, NOIA is now headed to SXSW, where the promising young producer will no doubt stun audiences. Keep an eye on NOIA, who we predict will be playing all your favorite summer festivals soon.

Isla de Caras

The music of Isla de Caras, the young Buenos Aires act born Lautaro Cura, has an aloof abstraction that’s almost addictive. His recent Todo lo sólido se desvanece en el aire EP occupies the space of robotic melancholy so many producers are exploring these days. The standout “Sería Fatal,” an airy and morose floater, captures the meticulous effortlessness of his music, and his creative philosophy, which he spoke to local magazine Regia about last year. “Part of art-making is laborious; it’s not just about impulse…For me, creativity is valuable in the sense that humans recognize themselves as creators.” The three-track EP dropped via Estamos Felices, a DIY imprint that has boosted the careers of indie greats like Banda de Turistas. We’re betting on Cura to become a shining beacon in Buenos Aires’ diverse, well-cultivated, and established indie community.